Application Delivery Blog

Software Load Balancers and Cloud Environments | Avi Networks

Abhi Joglekar
Posted on Apr 5, 2016 6:30:00 AM

 The Hardware Load Balancer Brick Wall Last month at Networked Systems Design and Implementation (NSDI)  conference, Google lifted the covers off Maglev, their distributed network software load balancer (LB) [1]. Since 2008, Maglev has been handling traffic for core Google services like Search and Gmail. Not surprisingly, it's also the load balancer that powers Google Compute Engine and enables it to serve a million requests per sec without any cache pre-warming [2]. Impressive? Absolutely! If you have been following application delivery in the era of cloud, say over last 6 years, you would have noticed another significant announcement at Sigcomm ‘13 by the Microsoft Azure networking team. Azure runs critical services such as blob, table, and relational storage on Ananta [3], its home-grown cloud scale software load balancer on commodity x86, instead of running it on more traditional hardware load balancers. Both Google and Microsoft ran headlong into what can be best described as “the hardware LB brick wall”, albeit at different times and along different paths in their cloud evolution. For Google, it started circa 2008 when the traffic and flexibility needs for their exponentially growing services and applications went beyond the capability of hardware LBs. For Azure, it was circa 2011, when the exponential growth of their public cloud led to the realization that hardware LBs do not scale and forced them to build their own software variant. So, what is this “hardware LB brick wall” that these web-scale companies ran into?
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Topics: ADC, SDN, Closed-Loop Application Delivery, Architecture, SSL, Analytics, Application Delivery Controller, Microservices, metrics, Software Load Balancer

All Brawn and No Brain: Application Delivery Without Analytics

avatar Ranga Rajagopalan
Posted on Jan 15, 2015 11:00:00 AM

Four factors are driving change in how applications are developed and deployed today. First off, today’s users access applications and services from a plethora of devices in addition to their static desktops. They demand secure access from work, from home, and on the go – all with consistent and reliable performance. Second, application architectures are evolving from traditional 2 / 3 tier models to distributed “microservices” architectures specifically to ensure efficient application delivery on mobile devices. This is exactly how applications at hyperscale companies such as EBay, Netflix, Twitter, and Amazon are architected. Third, application deployment locations have changed. Applications may be deployed not only at on-premise enterprise datacenters but also at several public cloud locations such as AWS. In addition, applications may span multiple datacenters and clouds for redundancy and higher performance. Finally, the efficacy of applications is now measured in terms of end-user engagement and satisfaction for both internal employees and external customers. As a result, end-user monitoring is critical for ensuring high quality service delivery and guaranteeing SLAs. Furthermore, the sprawl of microservices within and across clouds increases the need for improved visibility, monitoring, performance management, and security.
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Topics: ADC, Closed-Loop Application Delivery, CADP, Architecture, Analytics

Avi Networks: The Cloud Application Delivery Company

avatar Umesh Mahajan
Posted on Dec 10, 2014 1:56:00 AM

As CEO, my job is to listen to customers and understand their concerns. Throughout a decades-long career at Avi Networks and other highly-regarded tech companies, I’ve heard dozens of customers tell me about their challenges in moving to an on-demand, cloud services model. More than once, I’ve heard that the biggest area that gets in their way is the application delivery services model. We’ve witnessed significant change in the last decade. Today, we operate in a world where mobile devices and cloud environments are the new norm, causing a fundamental shift in application architecture to a microservices model. As a result, traditional application delivery solutions fall short because these solutions were not architected for an environment built for mobility, flexibility and elastic scale.
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Topics: Product, Innovation, Closed-Loop Application Delivery, CADP, Avi Networks

HYDRA: Hyperscale Distributed Resources Architecture

avatar Murali Basavaiah
Posted on Dec 10, 2014 12:30:00 AM

As an engineer, I know how hard it is to make things simple. I also know that any great solution must begin with a customer-focused mindset, and not one that creates technology for technology's sake.        At Avi Networks, we’re distinguishing our solutions with a single-minded focus on making things intuitively obvious. If that means adding a few extra weeks to the design cycle to make life easier for the user, we’ll do it. And every idea and conversation here begins by “walking in our customers’ shoes” because it’s essential that we truly understand their needs so we can invent new approaches that guarantee the best customer experience. I’d like to share with you four stories that give you a glimpse into our thought process, design challenges and engineering priorities as we set out to create the industry’s first cloud application delivery platform.
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Topics: Product, Innovation, HYDRA, Closed-Loop Application Delivery, Avi Networks, Architecture

   
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